Our Process: Systemic Therapy

Like the human body where different systems (e.g. muscles, nerves, organs) connect to make up a whole body, an individual person’s well-being is also systemic and made up of interconnections. For example, a person could be suffering from depression due to a chemical imbalance in the brain that is hereditary (biological), and/or due to past traumas suffered as a child (developmental), and/or due to grief and loss over a divorce or the death of a loved one (relational). Very often, people struggling with mental and emotional distress are experiencing two or more factors in interaction, making it challenging to resolve issues on their own.

At Rekindle, we use a systemic approach to therapy that recognises the interconnected and relational nature of mental health. Our therapists assess, diagnose, and treat individuals, couples, and families from an integrated and holistic perspective. Wherever appropriate, and with the clients' permission, we invite relevant family members to take part in the process of therapy. For more complex issues, our clinicians collaborate to provide care for all members of the family system, with clear adherence to the ethics of systemic practice that maximises benefit and minimises harm. (See therapy services to learn more.)

In the United States and Canada, the systemic approach to mental health has been championed by the field of marriage and family therapy (MFT), a licensed mental health profession. Currently, there are more than 50,000 marriage and family therapists in North America. The same discipline is also referred to as systemic psychotherapy in the United Kingdom and has been growing internationally. In recently years, the systemic approach to mental health has gained recognition in Malaysia, spearheaded by our founder and clinical director, Dr. Johnben Loy.


If you have further questions about our process to therapy, please feel free to contact us to enquire more.

Like the human body where different systems (e.g. muscles, nerves, organs) connect to make up a whole body, an individual person’s well-being is also systemic and made up of interconnections. For example, a person could be suffering from depression due to a chemical imbalance in the brain that is hereditary (biological), and/or due to past traumas suffered as a child (developmental), and/or due to grief and loss over a divorce or the death of a loved one (relational). Very often, people struggling with mental and emotional distress are experiencing two or more factors in interaction, making it challenging to resolve issues on their own.

At Rekindle, we use a systemic approach to therapy that recognises the interconnected and relational nature of mental health. Our therapists assess, diagnose, and treat individuals, couples, and families from an integrated and holistic perspective. Wherever appropriate, and with the clients' permission, we invite relevant family members to take part in the process of therapy. For more complex issues, our clinicians collaborate to provide care for all members of the family system, with clear adherence to the ethics of systemic practice that maximises benefit and minimises harm. (See therapy services to learn more.)

In the United States and Canada, the systemic approach to mental health has been championed by the field of marriage and family therapy (MFT), a licensed mental health profession. Currently, there are more than 50,000 marriage and family therapists in North America. The same discipline is also referred to as systemic psychotherapy in the United Kingdom and has been growing internationally. In recent years, the systemic approach to mental health has gained recognition in Malaysia, spearheaded by our founder and clinical director, Dr. Johnben Loy.

If you have further questions about our process to therapy, please feel free to contact us to enquire more.